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NHCA 2021 Virtual Conference has ended
Welcome to the 2021 NHCA Virtual Conference Schedule, below you will find the schedule listed with 3 types of education sessions, Live Platform, Pre-recorded Platform and E-Poster Sessions. They will all be delivered a little differently so please take a little time to read the descriptions and understand how the conference will be laid out.

  • Live Platforms: NHCA is offering 7 live sessions with interactive Q&A and chat features over the two days of the live conference. If you are not able to watch these sessions live they will be recorded and playback will be available until March 19, 2021
  • ON DEMAND Pre-Recorded Platforms: There will be 28 pre-recorded sessions that will be released on the first day of the conference, these will be available to watch at your leisure and will be available until March 19, 2021. PLEASE NOTE: They are available longer than the 1-5 pm time on the schedule but we are not able to program them in like that!
  • ON DEMAND E-Poster Sessions: There will be 8 E-Poster sessions available to watch, each session is 15 minutes long and worth a quarter of a credit, in order to receive a full hour you will need to watch 4 poster sessions all the way through and complete and evaluation. These will be available as pre-recordings and will be available from the start of the conference until March 19, 2021
This means you have the opportunity for up to 19.0 CE credits at this years conference! (See ASHA AND AAA Brand Blocks below)

If you are trying to login to the learning center to attend the conference, please CLICK HERE to go to the Learning Center, this is just a digital agenda!

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Thursday, February 25
 

2:00pm CST

Hot Topic Roundtables
The Covid-19 pandemic brought significant challenges for conducting the 2021 NHCA Annual Conference.  At the same time, the virtual nature of our meeting presents some new and exciting opportunities, join us in the below 30 minute interactive round table discussions to kick off the annual conference.

2:00 pm -Licensing and Ethics Issues in Hearing Conservation
Moderated By: John Allen
Covidhas also highlighted the demand for telehealth, remote, and mobile health services, to include hearing conservation. Issues surrounding licensing, working across state lines, and ethical challenges now, and as we go forward, will be the topics of this roundtable. Please come with your experiences, knowledge, and questions and let’s talk about this.

2:30 pm - Military Issues in Hearing Conservation
Moderated By: Amy Blank
Whether a member of the military, a DoD civilian working in hearing conservation, or just curious, in this session participants will delve into what it means to be a hearing conservationist in the US military, Come discuss the complexities of managing large DoD hearing conservation programs. Please come with your knowledge, your questions, your curiosity, and your enthusiasm.

3:00 pm - COVID-19 Issues in Hearing Conservation
Moderated By: Theresa Schulz and Andy Merkely
The current pandemic has impacted our lives in many ways. That impact has been keenly felt in the way we administer hearing conservation programs. Join us for this roundtable to learn from one another how we have adapted to this situation, from scheduling, to PPE, to sterilization of facilities and more.

3:30 pm - PSP Hot Topics
Moderated By: Teah Richey
This session is meant for sharing the hot topics in the area of Professional Service Providers. Come prepared to discuss those issues you and others find are of most importance today and in the future.

4:00 pm - Occupational and Industrial Hearing Conservation
Moderated By: Jim Jerome
If you have extensive background or just want to learn about this challenging and rewarding field of hearing conservation, come and share challenges, frustrations, solutions and successes! Come with questions and learn from each other. You will be sure to leave with new tools to use and resources you can tap.

4:30 pm - Careers in Hearing Conservation
Moderated By Jim Jerome and Madi Monlezun
This session will allow students and those early in their careers to learn about and discuss the variety of directions one can go in hearing conservation, from audiology, to occupational medicine, acoustical engineering and more. Please come with your knowledge, your questions, your curiosity, and your enthusiasm.

5:00 pm - The Role of Hearing Conservation in the Music Industry
Moderated By: Heather Malyuk and Laura Sinnott
This session is meant for sharing the issues that arise when “music” becomes “noise” and threatens the hearing of those working in the music industry and the recipients of their work. Come discuss situations you encountered, solutions you have found, and the joy of working in this field.

Thursday February 25, 2021 2:00pm - 5:30pm CST
Virtually

5:30pm CST

Meet and Greet with Trivia and Prizes
Thursday February 25, 2021 5:30pm - 6:30pm CST
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Friday, February 26
 

9:30am CST

Welcome Remarks
Friday February 26, 2021 9:30am - 10:00am CST
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10:00am CST

Live Session 1: Where We have been and Where We are Now: Occupational Hearing Loss in the United States
It has been an incredibly challenging year. It has been challenging for the field of hearing conservation and occupational hearing conservation. Audiometric testing for noise-exposed workers has been interrupted, research field studies and surveillance activities have been halted or postponed, time and resources have been diverted, and the priority of hearing loss prevention has been eclipsed by preventing disease transmission in the workplace. This is in addition to losses in business and personal losses among those who work in this field. Now is a good time to assess where we have been and where we are now - to take note of our successes and continuing challenges - as we move forward with our important work in a new and hopefully less challenging year. We will examine the numbers, including how many workers have lost their hearing, how many continue to be at risk, which workers are most in need of attention, and any progress in prevention. The sources of these numbers and the critical need for continued surveillance will also be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

1) The learner will be able to discuss the differences in the prevalence of hearing loss among U.S. industries and occupations.
2) The learner will be able to discuss the progress in hearing loss prevention efforts among U.S workers.
3) The learner will be able to identify and discuss the issues in hearing loss prevention efforts among U.S workers.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Masterson

Elizabeth Masterson

NIOSH
Elizabeth (Liz) Masterson is an Epidemiologist in the Health Informatics Branch (previously Surveillance Branch) of the Division of Field Studies and Engineering at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Project Officer for the NIOSH... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2021 10:00am - 10:30am CST
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10:30am CST

Live Session 2: The Need for a Re-Examination of ISO 1999
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors: 
Wei Qiu, Auditory Research Lab, SUNY Plattsburgh
Barry Lempert, USPHS, Ret.

The Need for a Re-Examination of ISO 1999 There are two major reasons to re-examine ISO 1999 and its U.S. counterpart, ANSI S3.44. The first is that the formulas to predict noise-induced hearing loss do not reflect the data on which these standards were originally based. Evidence from a recent study of the data and formula will be presented. The second reason is that the use of the equal energy rule (or 3-dB exchange rate) is not sufficiently protective for noises other than continuous or Gaussian noise. The earliest attempts at formulating criteria were based mainly on exposure to continuous noise, and, until recently, there has been a lack of attention paid to the temporal pattern of noise exposure. However, new developments using the kurtosis metric indicate that complex, non-Gaussian noise, which is common in many industrial conditions, is more damaging than Gaussian noise of equivalent energy. ISO 1999 and ANSI S3.44 provide the basis by which agencies or organizations develop damage-risk criteria for the protection of workers’ hearing, and thus it is important that their predictions accurately reflect the effect on hearing.

As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Participants will describe the background on the original attempts to standardize methods to predict noise-induced hearing loss.
2) Participants will describe the differential effects of continuous (Gaussian) noise and complex (non-Gaussian) noise.
3) Participants will discuss the difference between earlier and contemporary versions of ISO 1999 and the data used to formulate these standards.

Speakers
avatar for Alice Suter

Alice Suter

Suter & Associates
Alice Suter has worked in the area of noise effects and hearing conservation for more than 40 years. She has been influential in noise criteria development, regulation, and public policy, first at the U.S. EPA’s Office of Noise Abatement and later at OSHA. As Senior Scientist and... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2021 10:30am - 11:00am CST
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11:00am CST

12:00pm CST

Live Session 3: A new noise exposure criteria is needed for complex noise.
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Wei Qiu, SUNY Plattsburgh
Meibian Zhang, Zhejiang Provincial CDC
Alice Suter, Suter and Associates

From the earliest standards for occupational noise exposure, impulse noise has been recognized as presenting an increased hazard for developing hearing loss. Animal research has focused primarily on the chinchilla as a surrogate for the human ear due to the similarity of sensitivity and frequency range of hearing. Research from the SUNY-Plattsburgh has demonstrated that hearing loss in chinchilla and the kurtosis of the noise exposure are monotonically related for a given equivalent noise exposure level, LAeq. The risk of hearing loss increased with higher kurtosis to a point where the amount noise-induced hearing loss plateaued. SUNY-Plattsburgh, NIOSH, and the Chinese, Zhejiang Provincial Centers for Disease Control researchers have conducted a series of investigations with Chinese workers who have a history of noise exposure in a stable occupational setting. The findings from these investigations confirm the animal research, the risk of occupational hearing loss increases with an increased kurtosis of the noise exposure. This paper will examine the potential for a new noise exposure standard that incorporates both level and kurtosis.

As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Participants will learn about the differential risks of hearing loss due to continuous and impulsive noise.
2) Participants will learn about how kurtosis can characterize the composition of complex noise (combination of continuous and impulsive noise).
3) Participants will learn about different proposed metrics for assessing noise exposure with equivalent energy and kurtosis can be implemented to adjust for the excess risk of hearing loss in noise exposed populations.

Speakers
avatar for William Murphy

William Murphy

CDC NIOSH
William J. Murphy is a Captain in the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and is coordinator for the Hearing Loss Prevention cross sector for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. He is an active member of the National Hearing Conservation Association... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2021 12:00pm - 12:30pm CST
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12:30pm CST

Break
Friday February 26, 2021 12:30pm - 12:45pm CST
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12:45pm CST

Live Session 4: The association between hearing loss and hearing protector attenuation among miners
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Elon Ullman, University of Michigan
Lauren Smith, University of Michigan
Sandar Bregg, University of Michigan
Marjorie McCullagh, University of Michigan

This study used data collected under a larger study on noise exposure and injury rates among miners to investigate risk factors for poor earplug fit, with a focus on the association between hearing loss and personal attenuation ratings. Earplug fit was assessed by obtaining Personal Attenuation Ratings (PARs) using a Real Ear at Threshold (REAT) system. Hearing loss was assessed using the unoccluded hearing levels measured during the REAT testing and the results of a speech-in-noise test. We found high HPD usage (HPD worn on average 73.9% of the time) in a high noise environment (mean Time-Weighted Average exposure 85.5 dBA, range 65 - 103 dBA) among 207 participating workers from 11 aboveground mine sites. One quarter (26.7%) of workers had hearing loss, and 42% reported symptoms of tinnitus. PARs were highly variable (mean 25.4 dB, range 1.8 - 43.2 dB), and HPD use time was positively associated with noise exposure level. The results of adjusted linear regression models suggest that workers with a hearing loss achieved significantly lower PARs than those with normal hearing. Workers with hearing loss or a standard threshold shift should be prioritized for fit testing, as their hearing impairment may associated with poor HPD fit.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Classify areas of concern for hearing conservation program enrollment and personal protective equipment requirements.
2) Design noise maps to visual represent noise level measurements.
3) Manage priorities for OSHA compliance and personnel protection for noise exposed populations.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Neitzal

Richard Neitzal

University of Michigan (UM) School of Public Healt
Rick Neitzel, PhD, CIH, FAIHA is an Associate Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of Michigan (UM) School of Public Health. He is also an Associate Professor of Global Public Health and Associate Director of the UM Office of Global Public Health. He has published... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2021 12:45pm - 1:15pm CST
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1:15pm CST

2021 Safe-in-Sound Excellence in Hearing Loss Prevention Awards™
In this 12th round of Safe-in-Sound Awards the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the National Hearing Conservation Association (NHCA) will recognize organizations that document measurable achievements in hearing loss prevention. The submissions are evaluated against key performance indicators in a rigorous review process designed to capture and evaluate the successes. The attendees will get to hear about the innovative strategies and the success stories from the winners themselves firsthand; information which will be shared later to a broader community. Join us for the remarkable presentations! #wewanttohear!

Friday February 26, 2021 1:15pm - 1:45pm CST
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2:00pm CST

Networking Hour with Sponsors
Friday February 26, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm CST
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Saturday, February 27
 

9:30am CST

Welcome Remarks and Awards Ceremony
Saturday February 27, 2021 9:30am - 10:30am CST
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10:30am CST

Live Session 5: Hearing Conservation Strategies for a Mobile Workplace
Managing a Hearing Conservation Program in a workplace that rotates workers between jobs and shifts with highly varied sound profiles presents unique challenges within the industry. KIA Motors Manufacturing, Georgia faces this situation in several production areas. The keys to insuring compliance with OSHA and protecting employee hearing is constantly reviewing these areas, managing changes to the operation process, enrolling employees in the hearing conservation program, and reducing sound level exposures through the use of engineering controls and personal protective equipment. These strategies are further discussed in this presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Winget

Jeffrey Winget

KIA Motors Manufacturing, Georgia
Mr. Winget has been practicing in the field of Industrial Hygiene and Safety for more than 30 years. With experience in large manufacturing concerns, process industries, and consulting roles, Mr. Winget brings a breadth and depth of knowledge on topics essential to protecting worker... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 10:30am - 11:00am CST
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11:00am CST

Break
Saturday February 27, 2021 11:00am - 11:15am CST
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11:15am CST

Live Session 6: Turning Angst into Action During Covid-19 Challenges!
Not happy with present Audiology laws and regulations? Want to become an effective advocate to change laws, regulations and legislation that impacts your practice and patients? As a stakeholder, you have the power and passion to turn your angst into action to help make a difference! This advocacy workshop will help you effectively communicate with your elected officials, who have jurisdiction over your issue, from nuts to bolts! In this workshop, you will learn how to: • Identify and make appointments with staffers and or your elected officials • Learn virtual or face-to face pre-and post-meeting protocol • Articulate your legislative issue/passion succinctly

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Determine, identify appropriate staffers or elected officials pertaining to issue.
2) Compare and contrast differences between stakeholders and a lobbyists.
3) Recall pre-and post-meeting communication protocol.

Speakers
avatar for Vivianne Wersel

Vivianne Wersel

Military Officers Association of America
Dr. Vivianne Cisneros Wersel, is the widow of LT Col Richard "Rich" Wersel, Jr. USMC. She serves as the Legislative Committee Chair for Western North Carolina MOAA Chapter and the American Academy of Audiology Government Relations Committee. She is the Public Relations Officer for... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 11:15am - 11:45am CST
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11:45am CST

NHCA Business Meeting
Saturday February 27, 2021 11:45am - 12:15pm CST
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12:15pm CST

Gasaway Lecture: This Sound’s Important
Sound is all around us, and we all have our favorite sounds. But what sounds are important to you?  What sounds are important to others?  This talk will explore the importance of sound to you and to others.  Understanding what sounds are important and why they are important can help you to connect with those you interact with professionally.  So, what sounds are important?

Speakers
avatar for Don Finan

Don Finan

Professor, University of Northern Colorado
Donald Finan, Ph.D., is a Professor of Audiology and Speech-Language Sciences at the University of Northern Colorado. He received a BS in speech-language pathology and audiology from Eastern Illinois University and a MS in speech-language pathology from the same institution.  He... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 12:15pm - 12:45pm CST
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12:45pm CST

Live Session 7: The Birth of a Word and Applications and Implications of Big Data
Session Moderated By: Elliott Berger
In this luncheon talk for a virtual conference we will screen a TED talk by MIT researcher Deb Roy who wanted to understand how his infant son learned language — so he wired up his house with videocameras to catch every moment (with exceptions) of his son's life, then parsed 90,000 hours of home video to watch "gaaaa" slowly turn into "water." He then goes on to apply his methodology to examining communications, public media, and the interactions that arise. His talk contains astonishing, data-rich research with deep implications for how we learn and potential questions about how that may affect society. Following the video, there will be a moderated live audience discussion.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Explain what Deb Roy meant by feedback loops influencing both the subject (baby) and the environment (adults).
2) Describe how millions of data points can be represented graphically
3) Apply Deb Roy’s techniques of big data acquisition to suggest how to prevent noise-induced hearing loss.

Saturday February 27, 2021 12:45pm - 1:45pm CST
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1:45pm CST

Live Poster Session: See Below for the Specific Posters
This session will take place on zoom and all poster presenters will have a live breakout room for you to attend and speak with them about their poster. You may receive 1 CE for this session if you attend 4 of the posters and collect the CE redemption code from the presenter. For this session and to be able to switch from one poster to another you will have to update you zoom app to the newest version!

Saturday February 27, 2021 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
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1:45pm CST

Poster 1: Can You Tell Me How Loud This Is?: Audiological Verification of Non-Hearing Aid Amplifying Technologies
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Alex Meibos, University of Akron

The purpose of this project was to demonstrate how to use Audioscan Verifit 2 equipment to measure amplification output of specialized Hearing Protection Devices, such as In-Ear Monitors for musicians and other consumer headphone technologies. There is a vast deficit of research in this area and a need for more audiologists and other professionals who are promoting hearing conservation to have easily accessible clinical guidance on use of verification tools to counsel patients regarding safe use of these devices. Dangerous and loud sounds are everywhere and in order to promote hearing conservation it is crucial to inform consumers in order to attempt to protect them. This project was designed to provide clinical audiologists and other hearing instrument specialists with practical suggestions they can take back to their practices.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Grieggs

Elizabeth Grieggs

Northeast Ohio Au.D. Consortium
Elizabeth Grieggs earned her Bachelor of Science in Speech Language Pathology and Audiology in May of 2019 from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. During the pursual of her undergraduate degree, she presented at the 2019 American Speech-Language Hearing Association’s 2019 National... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
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1:45pm CST

Poster 2: COVID-19 FOCUSED GUIDANCE FOR AUDIOMETRIC BOOTHS
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Jennifer Mancini, US Army Public Health Center

Kimberly Parks and Jennifer Mancini U.S. Army Public Health Center COVID-19 FOCUSED GUIDANCE FOR AUDIOMETRIC BOOTHS NOTE: DR. THERESA SCHULZ ASKED FOR THIS PRESENTATION. THIS TOPIC WAS PRESENTED AT A DOD HEARING CONSERVATION TELECONFERENCE CALL. How to address ventilation issues associated with audiometric testing booths. It provides helpful information for the audiology community.. Air Exchange Rates are an important part of controlling particulates inside of buildings. With audiometric booths being a room within a room, and with some booths having their own exhaust, it’s necessary to ensure that the system is properly working, and providing the appropriate air changes per hour needed. The poster would explain: • How to calculate air changes per hour (ACH) for audiometric booths with and without exhaust ventilation • Proper cleaning and disinfection of the booth and equipment • How long booths should be left empty to ensure particles have been removed • COVID specific measures for worker and client safety • Reference websites • Examples of questions and answers the U.S. Army has regarding COVID-19 and audiometric testing • Examples: how to calculate air changes

Speakers
avatar for Kimberly Parks

Kimberly Parks

U.S. Army Public Helath Center
Ms. Kimberly Parks has been a mechanical engineer with the U.S. Army Public Health Center (USAPHC) for over 25 years. She has a Bachelors Degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Maryland Baltimore County. Ms. Parks is a licensed Professional Engineer (PE) in mechanical... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
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1:45pm CST

Poster 3: Hearing Protection Device Evaluated Products List (HPD EPL): Solving the competing issues of hearing protection and situational awareness
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Robert Williams, DoD HCE
Theresa Schulz, DoD HCE
Kathy Gates, zCore Business/DOD Hearing Center of Excellence

Hearing protection devices (HPDs) are often bought and donned without careful attention to how much noise attenuation is needed or appropriate to specific work environments. The objective should be to select an HPD that provides neither too little nor too much protection from noise, and allows the user to hear sounds critical to work performance. This is especially important in military settings, where survival may depend on situation awareness. The Department of Defense has developed a hearing protection evaluated products list (HPD EPL) to address the competing issues of noise, hearing loss prevention, and situational awareness. In this poster, we will discuss an updated decision tree to guide selection of HPDs. The poster will also update information about hearing critical tasks, associated training, and efforts to partner with HPD manufacturers.

Speakers
avatar for Kari Buchanan

Kari Buchanan

zCore Business/DOD Hearing Ctr of Excellence
Kari Buchanan, M.P.H., M.A. is a retired U.S. Navy Industrial Hygiene Officer providing contract support through zCore Business Solutions to the DoD Hearing Center of Excellence. Ms. Buchanan is currently managing efforts on developing a hearing protective device evaluated products... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
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1:45pm CST

Poster 4: Influence of Earplugs on the Loudness and Dynamic Range of Music played by Caucasian and Filipino musicians
Louder music may be equated with more enjoyment in some cultures leading to cultural differences in the loudness of music. In addition, use of earplugs may drive some musicians to play the music louder or play the softer pieces within the music louder leading to a reduction in the dynamic range (DR) or quality of music. The specific characteristics of earplugs (e.g. NRR) may further determine the extent of the effect of earplugs. In this study, 15 musicians of Caucasian origin and 21 of Filipino origin played music in five different conditions: Trial one of conventional and musicians’ earplugs, no earplug, and trial two of conventional and musicians’ earplugs. Maximum, minimum, average (LAVG) and peak levels were recorded using a dosimeter and the DR was derived. A Mixed ANOVA revealed main effects of culture and significant interactions involving cultural origin, the plugs versus no earplug conditions, type of earplugs, and trial number. Results suggest that use of earplugs may vary the overall loudness of music and the DR in some musicians. (This project was funded by the 2015 – 2016 Wirt C. and Mae S. Belcher Graduate Education Award in the College of Education & Human Services at West Virginia University).

Speakers
avatar for Vishakha Rawool

Vishakha Rawool

University of Mississippi
Vishakha Rawool, Ph.D., CCC-A, CPS/A, FRSM, FAAA is a Chair & Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders at the University of Mississippi. She also directs the Audiology & Hearing Science Laboratory at the University of Mississippi. She has several publications... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
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1:45pm CST

Poster 5: Measurement of industrial noise using a smartphone-based sound level measurement application
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Chucri Kardous, NIOSH
Liangliang Zhao, Jiangsu CDC, China
Yufei Liu, 3M China Ltd.

This study expands on previous studies examining the use of a smartphone-based sound level meter application (NIOSH SLM) to measure occupational noise exposures in industrial settings. The study was a collaboration of efforts by researchers from the Jiangsu Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (JSCDC), 3M China Ltd., and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). An initial evaluation was conducted in a sound-treated booth and followed by a field evaluation in two industrial facilities. Six different iOS smart devices were used with two types of external microphones to measure sound levels. Average sound levels measured by the NIOSH SLM app were compared with a reference (Class/Type 1) sound level meter. Results show that the average sound levels were within ± 2 dBA of the reference instrument -- both in the lab and the field -- when the microphones were calibrated using acoustical calibrators. Several factors influenced the accuracy and performance of the app including the type of smart device, how it was used/held, and the type of noise being measured. Additional field studies across various noise environments and for different occupations will be helpful to demonstrate whether smartphone-based exposure measurements can be widely adopted.

Speakers
avatar for Wei Gong

Wei Gong

NIOSH
Wei Gong CDC/NIOSH, Cincinnati OH, MS, CIH Wei Gong has 15+ years industrial hygiene experience. Prior to joining CDC/NIOSH, she was a deputy branch chief of Jiangsu Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention in China. She achieved a master’s degree in toxicology at Nanjing... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
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1:45pm CST

Poster 6: Prevalence of Hearing Protection Device Non-Use among U.S. Workers in 2007 and 2014
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Dierdre R. Green

Background: This study estimated the prevalence of hearing protection device (HPD) non-use and provided risk estimates among U.S. workers exposed to hazardous workplace noise. Methods: Self-reported data from the National Health Interview Survey in 2007 (15,852 workers) and 2014 (23,656 workers) were examined. Weighted prevalence and adjusted prevalence ratios of HPD non-use were estimated by demographic, industry and occupation. Differences in the prevalences of non-use were estimated and compared. Results: The prevalence of HPD non-use was 53% among all noise-exposed workers in 2014. Workers in the Accommodation and Food Services industry had the highest prevalence (90%) and risk of HPD non-use. Industries with the lowest prevalences of noise exposure had some of the highest prevalences of HPD non-use. There were no statistically significant changes in HPD non-use among industries between 2007 and 2014. Among occupations, HPD non-use increased 37% in Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports and Media, and decreased 39% in Architecture and Engineering. Conclusion: The prevalence of HPD non-use remains high; especially within industries and occupations with fewer noise-exposed workers. These groups need targeted attention. Employers should require HPD use, and provide trainings, and HPDs tailored to noise level and type, workplace environment, and individual comfort and convenience.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Masterson

Elizabeth Masterson

NIOSH
Elizabeth (Liz) Masterson is an Epidemiologist in the Health Informatics Branch (previously Surveillance Branch) of the Division of Field Studies and Engineering at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Project Officer for the NIOSH... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
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1:45pm CST

Poster 7: The Influence of Tinnitus and Hearing Loss on the Functional Status of Military Service Members and Veterans
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Susan Griest
Kathleen Carlson
Jane Gordon
James Henry

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of tinnitus and hearing loss on the functional status (e.g., activity limitations and participation restrictions) of military Service members and Veterans.
Design: Service members and Veterans completed audiologic testing and self-report instruments assessing tinnitus, hearing loss, and functional status. We conducted multiple linear regression analyses using cross-sectional baseline data with functional health status as the dependent variable. The primary independent variables were tinnitus (yes/no) and average low (0.25-2 kHz), high (3-8 kHz), and extended-high (9-16 kHz) frequency hearing thresholds. Secondary independent variables were subjective tinnitus severity and subjective hearing difficulties. Each of the six independent variables of interest was modeled separately for Service members and Veterans.
Results: After controlling for potential confounders, presence of tinnitus, tinnitus severity, average low-frequency hearing thresholds, and subjective hearing difficulties were significantly (p

Speakers
avatar for Samantha Lewis

Samantha Lewis

M. Samantha Lewis, Ph.D., is an associate professor and academic education lead in the School of Audiology at Pacific University in Hillsboro, Oregon. She also maintains an affiliation with the VA RR&D National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research and the VA Portland Health... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
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1:45pm CST

Poster 8: Review of Musician Hearing Health Care in the US
This survey-based study was created to identify attitudes and protocols of professionals who provide custom-made musicians' hearing protection devices. As musicians are particularly vulnerable to music-induced hearing disorders, it is important to understand clinical protocols and identify both gaps in care and opportunities for improvement.

Speakers
avatar for Kathryn Ideker

Kathryn Ideker

University of Texas at Dallas
Kathryn Ideker is a 3rd year Doctoral Student at the University of Texas at Dallas. She is a member of the UT Dallas Hearing Conservation Lab and has assisted in data collection on numerous projects regarding hearing conservation, HPD use, and suprathreshold hearing disorders. 


Saturday February 27, 2021 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
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2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Acoustic Standards for High-level Impulse Noise
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Gregory Flamme, SASRAC
Elizabeth Brokaw, MITRE Corp
Raj Gupta, US Army

High-level impulse noise has been a significant source of hearing loss among active duty military personnel, veterans, law enforcement and recreational firearm users. The development of standards for estimating the risk of hearing loss due to such exposures is complicated by a lack of human exposure data. Following World War II, the Army Research Laboratory conducted a limited series of studies that led to the development of MIL-STD 1474, which was based on peak exposure level and envelope duration. In the late 1980s, the US Army recognized that large caliber weapons had different outcomes than small-caliber firearms. The Army conducted the Albuquerque Blast Overpressure Walk-up studies that led to extensive debate about how to estimate the risk of hearing loss from these sounds. The DoD Blast Injury Prevention Standards Recommendation Process evaluated several candidate noise exposure metrics including equivalent energy exposure, Auditory Hazard Assessment Algorithm for Humans, Integrated Cochlear Energy model, and Auditory Model 4.5. Weapon noise measurements were used to highlight how maximum permissible exposures provide a framework that relates the disparate predictions from the models.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Participants will learn about different methods to assess Impulse Noise
2) Participants will learn about issues with accurate recordings and assessment of weapon noise
3) Participants will learn about the use of Maximum Permissible Exposures to compare Damage Risk Criteria




Speakers
avatar for William Murphy

William Murphy

CDC NIOSH
William J. Murphy is a Captain in the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and is coordinator for the Hearing Loss Prevention cross sector for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. He is an active member of the National Hearing Conservation Association... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: An Update from the CDC NIHL Workgroup
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Christi Themann, CDC
Thais Morata, CDC
William Murphy, CDC 

For nearly five decades, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has researched noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and disseminated public health information on hearing conservation. Key staff on the CDC NIHL Workgroup will provide recent updates on their collaborative activities including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Noise and Bioacoustics Team, the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH), the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the World Health Organization (WHO) Make Listening Safe initiative.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Describe hearing conservation activity of the NIOSH Noise and Bioacoustics Team.
2) Locate CDC public health materials for the prevention of NIHL
3) Identify the WHO Make Listening Safe initiative.

Speakers
avatar for John Eichwald

John Eichwald

CDC
John Eichwald is an audiologist within the Office of Science in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for Environmental Health. John has over 40 years’ experience in the field of Audiology. He has published extensively and made numerous presentations... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Audiometric outcomes,machining processes, and noise control materials in manufacturing
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors: 
Richard Sesek, Auburn University
Kellen Legge, Auburn University
Hayley Hack, Auburn University

Most manufacturing industries struggle to maintain OSHA compliance due to difficulties in control of noisy machining processes and audiometric monitoring of workers. The first aim of the current study was to evaluate typical audiometric threshold shifts over time sustained by workers employed in a bearings manufacturing plant. We looked at 74 serial tests of pure tone audiograms in manufacturing workers to investigate possibility of longitudinal changes in hearing sensitivity over time. Statistically significant but minimal threshold shifts were seen over time, supporting the value of audiometric monitoring annually. The second aim of this study was to evaluate Leq (predicted over an 8 hour TWA) for typical noisy machining processes in a muffler manufacturing plant. We found three types of processes (stamping, deburring, shearing) that were hazardous and differed in terms of the frequency spectrum of the generated noise. The third aim of the study was to investigate the noise reduction offered by low-cost insulation materials. We measured the absorption coefficient as a measure of the decrease in the intensity ratio of sound as it passes through a given substance. The absorption coefficient for that of polystyrene was significantly higher than that for vinyl for all frequencies.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Identify noisy machining processes in manufacturing
2) Identify low-cost sound absorption materials for Hearing Conservation Programs.
3) Identify the role of audiometric monitoring for identifying threshold shifts in manufacturing workers.
 


Speakers
avatar for Sridhar Krishnamurti

Sridhar Krishnamurti

Auburn University
Dr. Sridhar Krishnamurti is Professor and Program Director of Audiology at Auburn University. He currently serves on the research grants review panel for the Alzheimer’s Association and is also on the review board of several agencies and journals including Ear and Hearing, American... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Audiovisual Training Rapidly Reduces Hazardous Perceptual Errors Caused by Earplugs
Our ears capture sound from all directions but do not encode directional information explicitly. Associations between subtle acoustic features and the source locations that produce them must be learned through experience. Surprisingly, aspects of this mapping process remain highly plastic throughout adulthood: Adult human listeners can accommodate acutely modified acoustic inputs (‘new ears’) over a period of a few weeks to recover near-normal sound localization ability, and this process can be accelerated with explicit training. Here we sought to leverage this intrinsic plasticity in an applied setting to ameliorate disruptions of sound source localization caused by earplugs – presently a constraint on their usability. Sound source localization accuracy and the incidence of hazardous perceptual errors known as front-back confusions were measured across a series of brief training sessions. Provision of feedback via simple paired auditory-visual stimuli led to a rapid decrease in front-back confusions, even with only once-weekly exposure to the altered acoustic inputs. Moreover, training effects generalized to untrained sound source locations. Data yield insight on the nature and time course of perceptual learning for spatial hearing, and demonstrate that perceptual errors caused by earplugs can be substantially decreased with training, offering a practical means to increase their usability.Hearing loss and tinnitus are the most prevalent permanent injuries in the military, accounting for a substantial number of medical boarding actions. Hearing-related trauma can be attributed to hazardous noise exposure in active duty service members who, despite efforts from hearing conservation programs, continue to experience hearing-related issues warranting referral for audiological services. The increasing numbers of patients reporting such injuries are experiencing difficulties accessing audiological hearing readiness services within the Military Health System (MHS) due to its lack of specialty services in remote areas. As a result, some patients have delayed care and/or been referred out of the TRICARE network. However, current audiology virtual health (VH) services within MHS have demonstrated the feasibility to expand the accessibility of these specialized services and expedite its provision to patients in underserved areas. In addition to optimizing access to quality patient care for audiology and hearing readiness, VH has demonstrated ample potential to decrease expenses related to the number of travel reimbursement requests, patients’ time spent away from duty station, and potentially eliminating purchased care cost. The success of this initiative at select location has provided the opportunity for consideration of a larger-scale introduction into the MHS.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Identify possible reasons for sound localization associated with hearing protection misuse or disuse.
2) Describe front-back confusions associated with Hearing Protection Devices and why they can be hazardous.
3) Interpret auditory localization in adult listeners.

Speakers
avatar for David Audet

David Audet

University of Washington


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Between-subject differences in middle-ear energy transmission
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Kristy Deiters, SASRAC
Stephen Tasko, SASRAC

Airborne sound reaches the cochlea via the middle ear, which acts to minimize the impedance mismatch between the air and the cochlear fluids. Measurements of the amounts of energy absorbed as a function of frequency (i.e., wideband energy immittance) have recently been integrated in clinical equipment. Small- and medium-scale studies with convenience samples have demonstrated that these measures are reliable and differ systematically across people. However, no reports of such differences have ben made at the level of the U.S. population. In this study, we describe wideband immittance patterns observed in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) as a function of age, gender, race/ethnicity, and other factors. The potential role of between-subject differences in middle ear energy transmission as a component of susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss will be discussed.

As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Identify applications of wideband immittance and tympanometry in susceptibility to Noise induced Hearing Loss.
2) Describe the typical wideband absorbance spectrum related to middle ear transmission.
3) Describe the range of intersubject differences in wideband absorbance spectra in the U.S. population

Speakers
avatar for Gregory Flamme

Gregory Flamme

Senior Scientist, SASRAC
Gregory A. Flamme, Ph.D. is a Senior Scientist with Stephenson and Stephenson Research and Consulting (SASRAC). Prior to joining SASRAC, Dr. Flamme held faculty positions at Western Michigan University and The University of Iowa. He completed his Ph.D. in Audiology at The University... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Building synergy among CAOHC and NHCA
This presentation will inform participants about the mission, organizational structure, and strategic outlook of the Council for Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation (CAOHC). Further, the presenter will provide an overview of CAOHC's professional products, services, and certificate programs. Both CAOHC and the National Hearing Conservation Association (NHCA) share a common purpose to prevent hearing impairment from occupational and environmental sources. As such, the presenter will describe current and future combined CAOHC and NHCA efforts to promote awareness of the risk factors leading to hearing loss, educate the public on strategies to prevent them, and influence hearing conservation policy through advocacy.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Describe the CAOHC organizational strategy to advancing best practices in hearing conservation.
2) Identify products and services available to hearing conservation professionals for improving the quality of their clinical practice.
3) Evaluate CAOHC and NHCA joint initiatives for promoting hearing conservation and hearing loss prevention.

Speakers
avatar for Raul Mirza

Raul Mirza

CAOHC
Dr. Raul Mirza is the Chair of the Council for Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation and the Director of Clinical Public Health & Epidemiology at the U.S. Army Public Health Center. He has specialty board certification in Public Health and General Preventive Medicine... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Certification in the Time of COVID-19: DoD/VA Hearing Technician Distance Learning Course Update
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
John Merkley, U.S. Army Public Health Center
Kathy Gates, zCore Business Solutions, Inc.

Efforts to improve access to care prompted the Veterans Administration (VA) to change their policy, allowing certified Hearing Technicians (HTs) to conduct pure tone audiometric exams for established patients. Changes in DoD regulations have increased the need for certified HTs across the DoD, especially in the Army Reserve and Army National Guard. In 2019, the DoD Hearing Center of Excellence (HCE), in collaboration with the VA, and with support from the Council for Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation (CAOHC), began Joint Incentive Fund (JIF) pilot distance learning (DL) courses to train and certify Hearing Technicians. Training is conducted in three phases: a didactic, lecture portion using Adobe Connect Classroom or Microsoft Teams; a practical, hands-on phase completed onsite with either a CAOHC-certified Course Director or a trained audiology practicum instructor; and concluding with the online, CAOHC Occupational Hearing Conservationist certification exam. Between May and September, 2020, the DoD and VA completed five distributed learning workshops. This presentation will describe the successes, challenges, and lessons learned from the JIF DL program to date.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Identify two positive outcomes of the DoD/VA distance learning model of Hearing Technician certification.
2) Describe two challenges in Hearing Technician training faced by the DoD/VA distance learning team.
3) Describe how distance learning collaboration has benefitted DoD and VA audiology practices.

Speakers
avatar for Marjorie Grantham

Marjorie Grantham

VA Consultant, zCore Business Solutions, Inc.
Marjorie A.M. Grantham, Ph.D., F-AAA, CPS/A, Colonel (Retired), is a 30-year Army Veteran with over 25 years’ experience as a servant-leader in preventive medicine, education, public health, and research. She currently works for zCore Business Solutions, Inc., supporting DoD and... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Characterization of Noise Injury and Blast Exposure in Military Populations
Co-Presenters/ Co-Authors:
Christopher Smalt, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Julieta Scalo, Department of Defense (DoD)

The noise and blast hazards of many weapon systems cannot be completely abated without reducing mission effectiveness, and hearing protection strategies are ineffective when exposure is unpredictable or if sound intensity exceeds hearing protection device capabilities. “Characterization of Acute Short-term Military Population Auditory Shifts” (CHASMPAS) is a military study to characterize noise and blast exposures experienced during weapons training, monitor for acute or short-term-acquired hearing changes, and directly correlate such changes to noise and blast dose. This is done by collecting data in the field at the time of exposure, and by using advanced boothless audiology technology and noise and blast measurement techniques. Boothless technology allows rapid administration of tests for comprehensive evaluation of auditory function. The resulting dataset will be augmented with demographic and clinical data, and evaluated using multi-dimensional, big-data analysis methods. CHASMPAS aims to extensively characterize and map noise and blast conditions as they relate to various aspects of hearing function, and to evaluate dose-response effects and risk-mediating factors. This research will help elucidate the effects of injurious noise and blast and identify populations that may benefit most from future studies of pharmaceutical interventions for noise-induced hearing loss. This presentation discusses study aims, design, and preliminary results.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Describe the use of boothless audiology technology in assessment of threshold shifts in military service populations.
2) Describe the noise/blast measurement techniques employed in military exposures.
3) Describe preliminary findings of the auditory and noise/blast measurements data.
 


Speakers
avatar for Quintin Hecht

Quintin Hecht

DoD Hearing Center of Excellence
Quintin Hecht, AuD, is a research audiologist and project manager for the Department of Defense (DoD) Hearing Center of Excellence (HCE) at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas. Dr. Hecht joined the DoD HCE in 2016 and currently also serves as an Army Reserve Audiologist for the... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Consequences of COVID-19 on The Sound Exposure of Entertainment Industry Professionals
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
John Hawks, Gateway Biotechnology
Jianxin Bao, Gateway Biotechnology
Karla Rodriguez, Gateway Biotechnology

The purpose of this study was to capture the effects of COVID-19 pandemic on the sound exposure and tinnitus of entertainment industry professionals. A further objective was to gain insight into the incidence rate of other music-induced hearing disorders, use of ear-level devices, and other population specific demographic information. The study was a cross-sectional survey of entertainment industry professionals recruited from contacts of Soundcheck Audiology, Sensaphonics, and Facebook. A random control group of non-professionals was included for comparison. Respondents answered a range of questions regarding changes in sound exposure during COVID-19, as well as the incidence of music-induced hearing disorders. Further, respondents who indicated the presence of tinnitus answered questions related to characteristics, treatments,and changes in tinnitus during the COVID-19 era. Participants responded from 11 countries, approximately 20 job types within the industry, and approximately 25 music genres. Valuable information regarding the use of hearing protection devices and in-ear monitors was gathered but, more importantly, extreme changes in sound exposure due to the global pandemic were documented. The data gathered in this survey suggests that changes in hearing conservation education and care for the music industry are warranted in this era of a “new normal.”

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Describe how sound exposure has changed for the music industry in the COVID-19 pandemic.
2) Compare tinnitus questionnaire outcomes between music industry professionals and non-music industry professionals in the current pandemic.
3) Describe incidence rate of music-induced hearing disorders in the professional entertainment industry.
 


Speakers

Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: CPT Schad Goes to Prison
Chronicles my experience working at the United States Disciplinary Barracks (USDB) at Ft Leavenworth, providing audiology services to in-mates.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Identify the role of Hearing Conservation Programs in United States Disciplinary Barracks (USDB).
2) Compare USDB hearing conservation outcomes among in-mates, active duty Soldiers, and veterans.
3) Assess the challenges assocaited with treating this special USDB population.

Speakers
avatar for Maggie Schad

Maggie Schad

Irwin Army Community Hospital
CPT Schad is an ABA certified Audiologist. She completed her AuD at the University of Cincinnati and her externship at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. She is certified as a Professional Supervisor through the Council for Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Crossing Barriers to Reduce Occupational Hearing Loss
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Jason Booms, The Hannon Group, LLC
Bryan Beamer, NIOSH

Each year about 22 million U.S. workers are exposed to hazardous noise and about 12% of the U.S. working population has difficulty hearing. While many simple intervention strategies are well known by researchers, it can be difficult to implement them in the workplace. Researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) are conducting a four-year project to help prevent occupational hearing loss. Along with the help of The Hannon Group LLC, a public relations and market research firm, we have examined current attitudes on hazardous noise and hearing loss in the workplace and the beginnings of what an effective intervention campaign would look like. The Hannon Group designed, fielded, and analyzed in-person focus groups as well as telephone In-Depth Interviews (IDIs) with construction industry members to gather data on both workers and leadership in the construction industry. The research revealed that, after a need for awareness and awareness goals are reached, cultivating a strong multilingual social media presence will be an optimal method to reach intended target populations and motivate construction industry employees to take action by wearing appropriate PPE and/or taking other measures, such as engineering out elevated noise levels or purchasing quieter tools and equipment.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Identify Recommended Distribution Channels for Hearing Loss Information among Industrial workers.
2) Identify barriers of implementing hearing loss prevention techniques in industrial workers.
3) Learn what specific goals are needed for a common intervention plan in industrial workers.
 


Speakers
avatar for Asha Brogan

Asha Brogan

NIOSH
Asha Brogan is an ORISE Fellow at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) training as a Health Communication Specialist. Her health communication work is focused on hearing loss prevention and other health interventions including implementing effective social... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Evaluation of Hearing Protection Device Effectiveness for Musicians
Hearing protection devices (HPD) may offer protection to musicians, including some designed to provide uniform attenuation across frequencies. Even though these are available, studies find that musicians, especially students and instructors, do not wear them. Additionally, there is evidence indicating that many users do not achieve good fit and adequate sound reduction with HPD, which has led to recommendations for fit-testing in the workplace. Understanding the effectiveness of HPD in combination with musicians’ opinions about wearing them, we can make better recommendations for which types may be the most effective options for reducing excessive sound exposures. Twenty-four musicians were recruited and provided with three HPD: formable foam, non-custom uniform attenuation earplugs (UAE), and custom UAE. Audiometric testing was used to obtain personal attenuation levels at nine frequencies (125-8000 Hz) for each HPD which were compared to manufacturer ratings. The coefficient of variation of attenuation across frequencies was used to determine uniformity of attenuation. Participants completed surveys over six months regarding HPD use, and perceptions regarding positive and negatives aspects of wearing HPD. Survey questions were based on primary constructs of the Health Belief Model which is used to help predict whether people will engage in a specific health behavior.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Assess the importance of fit-testing when recommending HPD for workers.
2) Identify musicians' frequently reported benefits and barriers to wearing Hearing Protection.
3) Identify factors influencing HPD effectiveness for musicians.

Speakers
avatar for Kathryn Crawford

Kathryn Crawford

University of Iowa
Kate Crawford graduated with her PhD in the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health (OEH) at the University of Iowa in May 2020. Kate received a BA in Literature and a BS in Environmental Health from West Chester University in Pennsylvania. After interning with the Environmental... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Exposure to Ototoxicants in the Workplace – Recent Developments Towards Prevention of Potential Hearing Disorders
Noise remains the predominant cause of work-related hearing loss, but evidence demonstrates that certain common chemicals can also damage hearing. Chemicals identified as ototoxic include: solvents, metals, asphyxiants, carbon monoxide, organotins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PBCs), and certain pesticides. Reports from animal experiments demonstrate that chemicals can interact synergistically with noise or potentiate its effects. The interaction is modified by several factors, including the temporal distribution of the noise exposure. Some ototoxic chemicals can affect hearing even with low or no noise exposure. Evidence has prompted the proposal of new guidelines and standards on hearing loss prevention internationally. In 2018, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health jointly published the Safety and Health Information Bulletin Preventing Hearing Loss Caused by Chemical (Ototoxicity) and Noise Exposure. Since 2019, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists’ Threshold Limit Values® publication has included an ototoxicity notation to alert the occupational safety and health community about the potential hazard. In 2020, NHCA joined the International Ototoxicity Management Group, which will, now, include information on ototoxicants other than medications. This presentation will examine recent developments and suggest recommendations for preventing auditory effects of exposure to ototoxic chemicals.

Learning Objectives:
1. Participants will identify the classes of chemical ototoxicants that affect hearing.
2. Participants will determine factors that can affect risk of ototoxicity, including impulsive noise exposures
3. Evalaute chemical exposure solutions can reduce the risk of hearing loss.

Speakers
avatar for Thais Morata

Thais Morata

NIOSH/CDC
Thais C. Morata is an audiologist who has been working in the area of hearing loss prevention since 1987. She is a Research Audiologist at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH, Cincinnati, OH, USA). Her pioneering work in the area of noise interactions... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Hearing Conservation Program in the Agriculture Sector: An Evaluation
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Richard Sesek, Auburn University

Hearing loss is not as “dramatic” nor as sudden as traumatic injuries such as those from an overturned tractor or machine entanglement, but the damage is permanent, irreversible, and significantly impacts the sufferer’s quality of life. The prevalence of hearing loss is higher among those who work on the farms as compared to the general population. Hearing loss is insidious in nature; with the gradual onset often not recognized until significant losses have occurred. Farmers are frequently exposed to noise from the heavy farming machinery being in addition to other equipment that may contribute to hearing loss. Hearing loss commonly affects those farmers working in relatively continuous, high levels of noise (above 85 dBA), but contributions from intermittent machine use may also be problematic. In addition to the hearing loss itself, reduced hearing capability may lead to accidents and injuries on the farm, as their perceptual losses may prevent recognition of warning signals or imminent dangers associated with farming tasks. Although hearing loss can be reduced by using proper hearing protection and implementing engineering controls, many farmers remain unaware of the potential hazards of noise and the permanent nature of hearing loss. Accordingly, this study evaluates Hearing Conservation Programs.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Indentify factors associated with implementation of Hearing Conservation Program in the agricultural sector.
2) Identify issues associated with impementing Hearing Conservation Programs in the agriculture sector.
3) Identify the areas which require revision or improvement for Heaing Conservation in the Agricultural sector.

Speakers
avatar for Ravinder Thaper

Ravinder Thaper

Auburn University
Ravinder Thaper MS, AEP is a GRA & GTA in Industrial and Systems Engineering researching noise in the agriculture sector.


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Hearing protection device perform requirements – in Europe
Hearing protection devices have become a crucial part of occupational noise management and hearing conservation programs. Different test methods and product requirement have been developed and standardized to be able to provide information about the product performance to the user or the decision maker. This information is the basis for correct selection of products in various situations. However, the methods for product testing as well as the requirements on products varies between different parts of the world. Recently the eight parts of the product requirement standard EN352 as well as the two test parts of the method standard EN13819 have been revised in Europe. In addition, two new parts of EN352 and on new part of EN13819 have been developed. This presentation will give an overview of the structure of hearing protection related standards in Europe, as well as review the recent changes to these standards. Similarities and differences compare to American ANSI standards will also be highlighted.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Recognize the structure of Hearing Protection Device standards in Europe.
2) Identify the most relevant Hearing Protection Devices standards in Europe.
3) Explain the main difference between HPD requirements in Europe and the USA.

Speakers
avatar for Magnus Johansson

Magnus Johansson

3M Personal Safety Division
Magnus Johansson works for 3M Personal Safety Division as manager for acoustics development of hearing protection and communication solutions. He holds a MSc in applied physics and electrical engineering and a PhD in technical audiology from Linköping university in Sweden. After... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Hearing protectors fit-testint: preliminary results of earmuff instrumentation on manikin
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Chahinez Hocine, CRITIAS
Jeremie Voix, CRITIAS
Oliver Doutres
Frank Sgard, IRSST

The number of workers with hearing loss keeps increasing even though they are often equipped with hearing protection devices like earplugs or earmuffs. This could be due to one or both of the following main reasons: poor fitting or discontinuous wearing of the hearing protection devices (HPDs). Instrumenting HPDs with microphones may be an efficient way to assess their effective attenuation, encourage better use and overall improve their efficiency to protect workers against the risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss. This project aims specifically to develop a microphone-based sensing technology, inspired by a technology initially developed for earplugs, enabling earmuff fit-test as well as continuous measurement of workers’ real-time noise exposure. The methodology of the proposed research project relies on the development of finite ele-ment models validated by experimental measurements on human subjects to optimally position the least number of microphones on the instrumented earmuffs. Preliminary results obtained on Acoustical Test Fixtures (manikin) are presented and challenges for field tests on human subjects are discussed.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Assess advantages and limitations of using earmuffs for preventing noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL).
2) Discuss the potential benefits of using instrumented earmuffs to prevent NIHL.
3) Discuss the potential benefits of finite element modeling of earmuffs microphone instrumentation.

Speakers
avatar for Arthur Colombier

Arthur Colombier

École de Technologie Supérieure
From the beginning of his higher education, Arthur joined an engineering school, INSA Lyon (National Institute of Applied Sciences of Lyon) with the idea of entering the Mechanical Engineering department. Indeed, the latter offers its final year students the possibility of doing a... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Injuries, near misses, and noise exposures among miners
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Sandar Bregg, University of Michigan
Richard Neitzal, University of Michigan

This study aimed to identify predictors of injuries/near misses in the mining industry. Participants at 10 mining sites were monitored for 3 consecutive days in 2019. Dosimeters were used to assess Time-Weighted Average (TWA) noise exposures according to standards set by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Participants documented individual, organizational, and psychosocial exposure factors in a baseline survey, and documented injury/near miss history, job demand, and other factors via daily activity logs. Personal hearing protection attenuation and hearing threshold levels (HTL) were also measured. A total of 207 workers participated and 567 work shifts were monitored. Participants were exposed to an average MSHA TWA of 80.2 ±6.0 dBA and an average NIOSH TWA of 85.5 ±6 dBA. Over the past year, 44 participants (23%) reported a near miss and 67 (32%) reported an injury at work. Hearing loss and safety score were significantly associated with increased risk of near miss. Hearing protection use, Fatigue Severity Score, and previous serious work injury were associated with significantly elevated risk of injury. Based on these results interventions to reduce injuries associated with hearing loss and hearing protection use are warranted.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Assess noise exposures among miners
2) Describe association between noise exposure-related factors and near misses among miners
3) Describe association between noise exposure-related factors and injuries among miners

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Smith

Lauren Smith

Research Area Specialist, University of Michigan
Lauren Smith, MS, MPH, is Research Area Specialist Intermediate in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. She manages the Exposure Research Laboratory at the University (https://umexposureresearch.org/) and coordinates... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Leadership Lessons for New and Seasoned Leaders
A conversation for new and seasoned leaders for navigating normal and pandemic clinical environments. Content will include best practice methods on how to create change in the workplace and the challenges a leader may face along the way. Additionally, will discuss leadership style/characteristics that are best practice in order to sustain the change.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Attendees will learn best practice skills on how to create change in the clinical workplace
2) Attendees will learn how to address challenges in the clnical workplace.
3) Identify leadership styles/characteristics in order to sustain change.
 


Speakers
avatar for Angela Day

Angela Day

U.S. Army
CPT Angela Day is a Direct Commission, Active Duty, Army, Audiologist. She received her undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Pittsburgh and completed her externship at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. CPT Day is currently pursuing another graduate... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Managing auditory sensitivities in autism: the potential of smart hearing protection
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Rachel Bouserhal, CRITIAS
Jeremie Voix, CRITIAS

For many students on the autism spectrum, certain classroom sounds can hinder learning and even cause distress. While conventional hearing protection may relieve sound-induced distress, passive hearing protectors attenuate all ambient sounds and do not distinguish between sounds causing distress and those conveying information. Passive hearing protection used to block out distressing noises may therefore attenuate too much sound for the wearer, which can prevent classroom engagement. An electronic “passthrough” hearing protector could potentially overcome this limitation by attenuating undesired sounds while transmitting those that are useful for the wearer to hear. This project envisions a smart hearing protection device that can selectively filter out the noises each individual wearer is sensitive to, learning these sounds in real-time using biosignals captured from within the ear as indicators of distress. An initial effort to adapt an existing in-ear technology to manage auditory sensitivities is described. Multiple methods of real-time audio filtering are considered, including those based on machine learning methods as well as classical signal processing techniques. Preliminary findings are presented along with their implications for meeting the needs of the target population.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Identify the potential of smart hearing protection for managing auditory sensitivities.
2) Learn to use and accept challenges of adapting an electronic hearing protector for auditory sensitivities.
3) Compare effectiveness of real-time audio filtering methods.



Speakers
avatar for Danielle Benesch

Danielle Benesch

École de technologie supérieure
Danielle Benesch completed her bachelor's degree in cognitive science at Osnabrück University in 2019. In 2020, she started her research master's at École de technologie supérieure. During her master's, she has been working on the "Sensitive Ear" project under the supervision of... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: NoiseHelp.Auburn.edu: A Resource for Noise Abatement
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Ravinder Thaper, Auburn University
Sri Krishnamurti, Auburn University
Ed Youngblood, Auburn University
Jonghwa Oh, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Noise is ubiquitous in today’s workplaces and homes. While its presence is obvious, its effects are often unnoticed and underappreciated. Hearing loss can happen at work, at home, or at play. A major problem is that the ability to accurately measure noise has traditionally been restricted to a comparative few: those with relatively expensive sound level meters. The process of measuring noise is limited by the expense and perceived complication. Even when noise is recognized as a potential problem, feasible, cost-effective abatements are usually not readily apparent. This team of students and faculty with diverse backgrounds (engineering, industrial hygiene, audiology, and communications) has been working to solve these problems. They have been researching inexpensive means for consistently measuring noise (i.e., smartphone apps) and working to provide a portal to distribute this information along with potential noise abatements for many common noise sources. They have just launched NoiseHelp.Auburn.edu as website to disseminate this information and to aggregate best practices and effective solutions to common noise problems. They are actively seeking input to grow the site and this conference represents the ideal audience to both build and advertise this website.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Identify free/inexpensive smartphone apps for reliable measurments at home and in workplace.
2) Demonstrate effectiveness of noise abatement technologies in industry.
3) Apply web-based resource to enhance training and education for Hearing Conservation Programs.
 


Speakers
avatar for Richard Sesek

Richard Sesek

Auburn University
Richard Sesek holds a Master’s degree in Public Health and a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering with an emphasis on Ergonomics and Safety. He has taught graduate and undergraduate level safety and health related courses for over 20 years. Prior to academia, he worked as an OSHA consultation... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Please Don’t Stop the Music…I Mean Outreach Healthy Hearing Outreach in the Coivd-19 Era
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Danielle Kelsay, The University of Iowa

When Covid-19 swept across the world, life as we knew it came to a halt. Large gatherings were canceled, schools were closed, and businesses were shuttered. With the abrupt change, new opportunities arose, as online usage increased. Facebook saw daily website usage jump by 27% from January 15 to March 24 in the United States (Koeze & Popper, 2020). Other platforms, like Zoom, went from under two million daily users to over six in the same time frame (Koeze & Popper, 2020). With the switch from in-person interactions to online, the ability to interact with individuals and continue outreach events was not only plausible but offered unique opportunities. Audiology graduate students participating in University of Iowa Sound Awareness for Everyone (UISAFE) jumped at the opportunity. Historically, UISAFE has been an active member of the local community spreading healthy hearing messages using best practices. To continue these efforts, UISAFE participants developed a plan to cohesively reach targeted audiences through social media channels and online meeting platforms. This presentation discusses best practices for online outreach, discuss avenues to continue healthy hearing messages in a virtual setting and identify benefit of using technology for outreach, both during a pandemic and in the future.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Discuss best practices for online outreach/marketing
2) Identify ways to track outreach within the community
3) List possible benefits of using online, healthy hearing outreach in today’s environment

Speakers
avatar for Kellsie Busho

Kellsie Busho

The University of Iowa
Kellsie is a Clinical Supervisor, Audiology at The University of Iowa. She has certifications in AuD, University of Minnesota and ASHA Certification CCC-A.


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Progress in Preventing Hearing Loss: Healthy People 2020 and Beyond
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Howard Hoffman, NIDCD

“Healthy People” is the federal public health agenda in the United States. Every ten years, the program establishes measurable objectives across a range of health issues and promotes tools and resources to enable progress toward meeting these goals. In 2010, Healthy People 2020 set eleven hearing-related objectives, including four targeted specifically at reducing noise-induced hearing loss. New cases of occupational noise-induced hearing loss decreased from 2.2 per 10,000 full-time workers per year in 2008 to 1.4 cases per 10,000 workers in 2017, meeting the targeted 10% reduction. The prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss among adults aged 20-69 decreased from 121 per 1000 to 104 per 1000 overall, exceeding the HP2020 target of 109 per 1000; however, certain sub-populations – including males, Hispanics, and those with a high school education or less – still showed a prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss well above the target. Use of hearing protection devices increased among adults but decreased among adolescents. In August 2020, new objectives for Healthy People 2030 were launched, including three targeted at noise-induced hearing loss. Setting and monitoring measurable public health objectives and providing tools and resources to meet these objectives has been a successful approach to improving hearing health.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Identify three reasons for monitoring hearing health objectives as per Healthy People 2020.
2) Identify one hearing-related HealthyPeople 2020 objective which successfully met its target
3) Evaluate tracking of disparities in meeting of Healthy People 2020 objectives.

Speakers
avatar for Christa Themann

Christa Themann

NIOSH
Christa L. Themann, MA, CCC-A is a research audiologist on the Noise and Bioacoustics team at the CDC National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). She manages audiometric testing for several large epidemiologic studies, including the National Health and Nutrition... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Safer choir rehearsals in the period of COVID19
Reports of deaths from choir rehearsals without masks, where COVID19 aerosols had flooded the room from prolonged loud singing, have resulted in suggestions that the only safe rehearsals are conducted outdoors. An unmasked sneeze can result in aerosols 26 feet from the sneezer, and singing fortississimo can release a prolonged flood of dangerous aerosols in an indoor rehearsal space. As the conductor of a small church choir for 35 years, the author speculated that there might be an alternate approach to reducing risk, including a) wearing effective masks, of course (the N95 mask muffles the singer’s voice, but a mask rated as equally safe does not), b) increasing the spacing between singers to perhaps 10 feet, and c) sacrificing the drama of loud singing, all of which might reduce the risk below “shopping with cloth masks.” Two choir members thought it would be difficult to hear each other at those distances. A quick experimemt with a quartet singing harmony at 12 foot spacing in the Sanctuary resulted in the surprised comments: “It was easier to hear the harmony!” This abstract is too short to explain why, but the reader who took a class in acoustics may recall the reason.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Identify the music perception at increased distances in choir practices in pandemic.
2) Identify the effects of facial masks on music perception.
3) Loud singing inside choirs without masks has been associated with COVID19-related deaths from the spreading of aerosols.

Speakers
avatar for Mead Killion

Mead Killion

MK Audio
Mead C. Killion has two degrees in mathematics, a PhD in Audiology from Northwestern University, and an honorary Doctor of Science degree from Wabash College. He is Founder and Advisor to Etymotic Research, and President of MCK Audio, Inc., a new company dedicated to bringing successful... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Tablet-based alternatives to field attenuation evaluation systems
Earplugs are a very popular form of hearing protection device (HPD), but they must be correctly sized and properly inserted to ensure that they consistently provide enough attenuation to protect from high-level noise exposures. Under ideal circumstances, it would be possible to check the personal attenuation ratings (PARs) of all noise-exposed personnel with a commercial-grade Field Attenuation Evaluation System (FAES) to verify that they are all issued suitable HPDs and that they know how to use them. However, practical considerations often preclude the use of these systems for all noise-exposed workers. In such cases, it may be necessary to consider alternative solutions that are more portable or less burdensome than traditional FAESs but still provide adequate information about the attenuation provided by HPDs. In this study, we evaluated a variety of simplified procedures run on a commercial tablet for estimating HPD attenuation and compared their results to attenuation values measured with a commercial FAES. The advantages and disadvantages of each approach will be discussed in addition to the appropriate real-world scenarios in which each method could be deployed. The potential for using the tablet-based approaches for HPD education and training will also be discussed.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Describe current methods of measuring personal attenuation ratings for Hearing Protection Devices.
2) Identify portable assessment tools for Hearing Protection Devices.
3) Describe one tablet-based Personal Attentuation Rating screening and assessment tool.

Speakers
avatar for Coral Dirks

Coral Dirks

WRNMMC
Full list of authors: Coral Dirks Devon Kulinski Kerry Chmielenski Lee Ann Horvat Matthew Makashay Roberta Martorana Douglas Brungart


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION: Working with Musicians: From Booth to Fit
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Frank Wartinger, Earmark Hearing Conservation

Musicians are inherently at risk for Music Induced Hearing Disorders (MIHD). The most effective way to mitigate the impacts of dangerous sound pressure exposure levels and subsequent MIHD is through routine audiologic monitoring, education, and use of appropriate hearing protection. The presenters will offer evidence and best practices on how best to manage musicians and music industry professionals. Audiologic testing, counseling, and recommendations for Hearing Protection Devices (HPDs) and personal monitoring equipment will be discussed. With recommendations from the American Academy of Audiology Clinical Consensus Document, Audiological Services for Musicians and Music Industry Personnel, participants will be provided resources and tools to inform their practice. The presenters will preview the Music Exposure Inventory, a questionnaire designed to assist clinicians in refining treatment and management of musicians and music industry professionals.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Participants will be able to identify individuals who are at risk for Music Induce Hearing Disorders.
2) Participants will apply new knowledge of clinical test batteries for Music Induced Hearing Disorders.
3) Participants will implement best practices in verification of hearing protection devices for musicians.

Speakers
avatar for Brendan Fitzgerald

Brendan Fitzgerald

University of Rochester Medical Center
Brendan Fitzgerald, AuD, CCC-A, MM, is a Clinical Audiologist at the University of Rochester Medical Center (Rochester, NY). He completed his Doctor of Audiology (AuD) degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 2020 with an externship at the Cleveland Clinic (2019-20... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION:The New Age of Professional Supervision:Technology As an Asset
CAOHC does an excellent job of defining the various tasks that can be part of the ‘Professional Supervisor’ role of a Hearing Conservation Program (HCP). OSHA CFR 29 1910.95 does not provide specific task guidance per se, but is clear in its Standard that all programs must be ‘responsible to an audiologist or physician’. As employers are typically more familiar with OSHA than they are with CAOHC, Professional Supervisors are left with hefty job of educating employers in terms of what the scope of practice is for the licensed health care professional overseeing HCPs. Thankfully, there are HIPPA-compliant internet-based tools that facilitate both employee assessment as well as associated follow-up actions that can communicate progress real-time and allow for effective collaboration between professionals who may not even be located in the same state. I remain continually impressed with the dedication and professionalism of Health and Safety Professionals running HCPs. Current innovative technology such as protected web portals help bridge the distance gap between these two parties to allow for optimal guidance and effective day-to-day management of HCPs.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Assess the difference in terminology between CAOHC and OSHA 29 CFR 1910.95 as it pertains to professional supervision of Hearing Conservation Programs.
2) Determine techniques incorporating current internet-based technology that can help manage HCPs remotely.
3) Identify strategies to help Professional Supervisors develop effective communications with Health and Safety Professionals.

Speakers
avatar for Renée Lefrancois

Renée Lefrancois

SHOEBOX Ltd.
Renée is a licensed audiologist based out of Ottawa, Canada. She obtained her B.Sc (Biology) and M.Sc (Audiology) from the University of Ottawa, as well as her PS/A CAOHC Certification in 2018. Her professional background includes clinical experience in occupational audiology, cochlear... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION:Threshold Shift Susceptibility Correlated with Pre-Cochlear Amplification in Chinchilla
Background: Without sufficient understanding of individual differences in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) susceptibility, it is difficult to create accurate and effective healthcare guidelines for NIHL-risk. In humans, the transfer function of the open ear (TFOE) and the transfer function of the ear canal (TFEC), two measures of pre-cochlear amplification (PCA), range from 5-19 dB-A. This variety in PCA suggests individuals with the highest PCA are likely to be 3-4x more susceptible to NIHL than those with the lowest PCA. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that higher PCA is correlated with higher NIHL susceptibility following a hazardous noise exposure in an animal model. Design: Five chinchillas were exposed to 89 dB-SPL of 4 kHz octave-band noise for 24 hours. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds were obtained pre-exposure and post-exposure. The relationships between subject’s PCA (TFOE and TFEC) and severity of ABR threshold shift were analyzed. Results: A strong correlation was found between TFEC and ABR threshold shift (animals with higher TFEC exhibited more threshold shift). Body weight and ABR threshold shift were also strongly correlated (smaller animals exhibited more threshold shift). Body weight may serve as a proxy metric for TFEC, as these factors were also found to be strongly correlated.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Understand the external ear's role in amplification
2) Understand that in-ear noise dose varies significantly after accounting for pre-cochlear amplification
3) Understand the current human and animal data that suggest that PCA has a significant effect on individual susceptibility to NIHL

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Grinn

Sarah Grinn

Professor, Central Michigan University
Dr. Sarah K. Grinn is an assistant professor in the Division of Audiology at Central Michigan University. Dr. Grinn's research lab is focused on improving the accuracy of a model that predicts individual noise-induced hearing loss susceptibility by examining the role of external-ear... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually

2:00pm CST

ON DEMAND SESSION:Virtual Health -Audiology & Hearing Readiness
Co-Presenters/Co-Authors:
Theresa Galan, Army
Lauren Benitze, Army

Hearing loss and tinnitus are the most prevalent permanent injuries in the military, accounting for a substantial number of medical boarding actions. Hearing-related trauma can be attributed to hazardous noise exposure in active duty service members who, despite efforts from hearing conservation programs, continue to experience hearing-related issues warranting referral for audiological services. The increasing numbers of patients reporting such injuries are experiencing difficulties accessing audiological hearing readiness services within the Military Health System (MHS) due to its lack of specialty services in remote areas. As a result, some patients have delayed care and/or been referred out of the TRICARE network. However, current audiology virtual health (VH) services within MHS have demonstrated the feasibility to expand the accessibility of these specialized services and expedite its provision to patients in underserved areas. In addition to optimizing access to quality patient care for audiology and hearing readiness, VH has demonstrated ample potential to decrease expenses related to the number of travel reimbursement requests, patients’ time spent away from duty station, and potentially eliminating purchased care cost. The success of this initiative at select location has provided the opportunity for consideration of a larger-scale introduction into the MHS.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this Continuing Education Activity, readers will be able to:
1) Assess benefits of virtual telehealth for military service members.
2) Identify different virtual telehealth platforms currently being used within the Military Health System.
3) Identify billing codes used to appropriately designate a virtual health appointment.

Speakers
avatar for Georgina Blasco

Georgina Blasco

Army
CPT Blasco is an Army Reservist recently mobilized to Ft Hood, Texas in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. During her mobilization, she served as the Chief Audiologist of the Deployment Readiness Center at Ft Hood. On the civilian sector, Dr. Georgina Blasco is a staff audiologist... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtually